New site

Dear Being a Sunbeam tribe.  I have moved the blog over to Clare Norman Coaching Associates Ltd.  Please come and join me over there for more posts on coaching for transitions and leadership.  You can subscribe to receive the blogs in your inbox just as before.

See you over there.

If you just stumbled across this blog, and want to learn more about creating a coaching culture in your organisation…
Step 1. Receive Clare’s blog posts in your inbox – subscribe below

Step 2. Follow Clare’s Conversations on twitter at @clareenorman

Step 3. Find out how coaching could support your organisation at http://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/

And pass this post on to all your friends and colleagues, so they can join the movement too.

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Coaching to leave an organisation – redundancy

Last week, we teed up the idea of coaching to help employees who are leaving an organisation, through their own choice.  Let’s now look at coaching to support people at a time of redundancy of role (I think that is a peculiarly UK phrase, which in other countries may be called being let go.  This is not the same as being sacked or severed for misconduct).

Typical outplacement companies focus on the practicalities of helping you to get a new job – tactical things like how to write a curriculum vitae, how to use Linked In, writing an application etc.  Those are all good, but there are two other things that need to happen first:

  1. working through the emotions of being let go (and this is a roller-coaster ride of emotions, let me tell you)
  2. figuring out who you want to be in the world in this new chapter in your life

You might argue that you just need to get practical and get stuck in to looking at job boards, applying for everything you see, and just going for it – you need a salary after all.

But my counter-argument is that you might end up in the wrong job, or not succeed at interview because you are unclear yourself about exactly what it is you want.  Not to mention all those ugly emotions seeping out at interview because you haven’t processed them.

Change curve during redundancy

So let’s start with the emotions.  You may have heard of Elizabeth Kubler-Ross (1969), who introduced the change curve to describe the process of grieving, and we see similar reactions to changes in our work and lives.  Pritchett, in the course Business As Unusual, describes how the change curve has an impact on our productivity and progress.  We start at the status quo, and when a change is imposed upon us, there is a sense of betrayal. This is less marked when we choose the change ourselves, but nonetheless, there is a feeling of “why am I choosing to rock the boat?” We move on to denial, burying our head in the sand and acting as though nothing is different.  You can imagine how that stops us from progressing.  Then there’s identity crisis – who am I in this new circumstance; I can no longer be the person I was before, or do the same things I did before; I’m lost.  As we go through these first three stages, our energy is spent on things other than being productive, and our motivation is low. Finally, we move into a search for solutions, and back up the energy and productivity curve we go again.

Slide1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Search for roles during redundancy

So you can see that you cannot search for solutions – or in this case, search for a new role – until you have got the feeling of betrayal out of your system (at least to some extent, as this takes time to get completely out of your system), stopped denying the situation, and then done some work on your identity.  Who are you now, what do you stand for, what are your greatest strengths and transferable skills, who do you want to be in this new chapter in your life, what is this teaching you etc.  This is quite a substantial piece of work that needs some quiet time to percolate, and plenty of conversations with others to come to the surface.

In my situation, I’d say that searching for my new identity took about 6 months from knowing that my role was going, to knowing who I wanted to be and how I wanted to work.  I thought I knew at 2 months, but I was still applying for roles that weren’t a perfect match with what I wanted to do, and wouldn’t have been growth opportunities for me.  It turns out that what I really wanted was to be my own boss (something I had railed against for years, but realised as a consequence of the interview processes and other conversations).

Coaching to support us through redundancy and the change curve

I know we don’t all have the luxury of 6 months to decide on our next steps, but we can have a coach supporting us to work through the curve, so that we apply for roles that are perfect for us rather than going for a compromise.  Oh and we should also remember that most roles aren’t even advertised, so once we know what we want to do, we can start to have conversations with the kinds of organisations we would like to work for, to see what opportunities might come out of those conversations.  One lesson I learned early on though, was to have conversations when I wasn’t clear as well, as every conversation added some kind of clarity to the picture for me.

It’s a difficult time.  Having someone walking beside us, who understands the difficult emotions that are getting in our way and the identity crisis we are going through, will really help us immensely.

I know, from experience, that working with an experienced coach (before we work with an outplacement consultant) is transformational.

If you just stumbled across this blog, and want to learn more about creating a coaching culture in your organisation…
Step 1. Receive Clare’s blog posts in your inbox – subscribe below

Step 2. Follow Clare’s Conversations on twitter at @clareenorman

Step 3. Find out how coaching could support your organisation at http://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/

And pass this post on to all your friends and colleagues, so they can join the movement too.

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The employee experience: coaching to support leaving an organisation

We’ve almost come to the last chapter, with our employee experience journey, where we started with the employee joining the workforce and now we are looking at coaching to support leaving the organisation – or even leaving the workforce through retirement.

If you are just joining our journey now, you might want to catch up on what we’ve covered so far – the theme being how coaching can support change and the human transition within that change.

We started by looking at the employee journey through the employee lens: Right people, right place, right time – the employee’s perspective

From there, we looked at The career sweet-spot – helping the employee to find that sweet-spot.

We looked at coaching roles to support the employee experience, through three lenses:

And latterly, we’ve been working our way through each of the change points in the employee experience.

And that brings us to leaving the organisation or the workforce.

 

Transitions in organisations

 

 

 

 

There are various reasons for leaving an organisation, and the coaching for each reason is likely to be different.

Coaching to support leaving an organisation – when the employee makes the decision

The person who has decided to leave for a new organisation will want to close down their relationship with this organisation and the people in it, without burning any bridges – who knows whether they may want to come back in future, or be considered for a role in another organisation by a former leader in the company they are now leaving who has moved to that organisation.  It’s quite likely that the employee in this position may not even be thinking about ending well, but they’ll need to do that so that they don’t take old baggage with them into the new organisation.  You cannot have a good new beginning until you’ve had a good ending – I know, it sounds back-to-front, but think about it.

Transition Coaching 2 Large

 

 

 

 

 

 

So the employee who is leaving the organisation may consider using a coach to help him/her to:

  • Make a good ending of their current role; saying all their thank yous and good-byes; celebrating the ending; letting go
  • Get themselves physically and mentally fit for the new start
  • Organise him/herself to be effective
  • Identify what they need to learn and from what sources
  • Bring the best of who they are into this unique culture; being authentic and significant

That will take them through the ending and the neutral zone, and we’ll talk about the coaching they may want in their first 90 days of their new role in the next post.

It’s possible that with a good relationship, the manager could provide the coaching here – but it’s likely that his/her time will be swallowed up with finding a replacement.  So if time only allows for a good-bye and good luck, the coaching may come from an internal or external coach.  The organisation likely won’t pay for this coaching, which probably means the employee will need to choose and pay for their own external coach in this circumstance.

Coaching to support leaving an organisation – when the employee is taking a leave of absence

Let’s say you have decided to go back to college to study.  Or you’ve decided to travel the world and your organisation has agreed to give you a leave of absence.  Some enlightened organisations actually encourage sabbaticals – the employee comes back refreshed and with renewed vigour and ideas for the work.  It’s less likely that they will offer you coaching to help you to make the transition out of the workplace and into your sabbatical, but it’s a great idea, as this is just as much of a change as any other you will encounter in your career and life.

You might use coaching to help you to wrap up your work, prioritising what you can and cannot accomplish in the days and weeks before you go.  You may also use it to consider what how you want to shape the sabbatical, so that you get what you want out of it; and who you want to be in the new surroundings, for example how do you want to introduce yourself to your fellow students, or to fellow travellers, and what new ways of being do you want to “try on for size”?.  You may have logistical things to consider, such as renting out your house, or finding someone to look after your cat while you are away, and it can help to talk through options.

When you re-join the workforce, you may want coaching again to make the shift back into the working world.  Both ways, there will be some psychological stuff going on too – about what you are losing and leaving behind, and what you don’t know about the new situation.

Here again, it seems likely that the employee will need to seek their own external coach for this.

Coaching to support leaving an organisation – redundancy

Redundancy has particular coaching needs.  There are the practicalities of finding a new role.  But there is also the emotional turmoil to work through.  I’m going to come back to this in a separate post, as I have a lot to say about it (having experienced redundancy myself).  You can’t get practical until you’ve got over the betrayal and the denial, and the loss of identity.  So we’ll talk about how coaching can support that process before outplacement can be successful.

Coaching to support leaving an organisation – retirement

Retirement is going to take its own post too, as there may be identity crisis work to be done, as well as the practicalities.

 

If you just stumbled across this blog, and want to learn more about creating a coaching culture in your organisation…
Step 1. Receive Clare’s blog posts in your inbox – subscribe below

Step 2. Follow Clare’s Conversations on twitter at @clareenorman

Step 3. Find out how coaching could support your organisation at http://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/

And pass this post on to all your friends and colleagues, so they can join the movement too.

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The Employee Experience: Coaching to Change Role

Transitions in organisations

 

 

 

 

 

Coaching to change role can help you in multiple forms of changing role:

  • Sideways move to a similar role in a different function
  • Individual Contributor to first time manager
  • Managing others to managing a function
  • Managing a function to managing a business

Coaching can help at different stages of the decision-making journey.  For example, you may know that you are not happy in your current role, but don’t know what you would prefer.  Coaching can help you to articulate what a good fit might look like for you, so that as you search for new positions, you’ll know which roles to apply for that would be fulfilling for you.

You may want to get promoted, but need some help to figure out how to be recognised as being ready for that step up.  Coaching can help you to think through what is expected of you and how you might go about demonstrating the skills and behaviours needed; and who you need to impress.

You may already have the new role, and want to make a good first impression – not to mention transitioning our of your old role well.  Coaching can give you the time and space to identify how to do both of those as well as how you want to be.  And if you are moving up in the organisation, pay attention to what you need to jettison that made you successful in the past, but that is no longer needed at your new level.

So the question is, do you choose your manager as your coach, an internal coach or an external coach?  As we said in a previous post, it really depends upon honest you feel you can be.  The more honest you can be, the more you will gain learn about yourself so that you can make the best decisions for you.  Of course, you’ll want to have conversations with your manager about his/her expectations, to get clear about what your outcomes are, but that will be a different role compared to coaching.

You might also think about choosing a coach who understands the psychology of transitions – what goes on inside us when we are making a decision to stay or to move; leaving that role behind; the feeling of uncertainty; and then starting a new role – and how to harness that to move us forward.

Transition Coaching 2 Large

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you just stumbled across this blog, and want to learn more about creating a coaching culture in your organisation…
Step 1. Receive Clare’s blog posts in your inbox – subscribe below

Step 2. Follow Clare’s Conversations on twitter at @clareenorman

Step 3. Find out how coaching could support your organisation at http://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/

And pass this post on to all your friends and colleagues, so they can join the movement too.

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Coaching the Employee Experience: Change in Role

Transitions in organisations

 

 

In this series, we’re looking at how to use coaching to support a phenomenal employee experience during the transitions that employees encounter in their careers.  Coaching isn’t the only intervention of course, but it can help the employee to work with the psychological impact of change – what are they leaving behind, what are they struggling with in the “not knowing”, and how do they make a great new beginning.

So far, we’ve looked at transition coaching for people joining the workforce and re-joining it.

Let’s turn our minds to the needs of those who have a change in role.  By this, I mean people who remain in their current position, with:

  • An increase in scope and scale of responsibility or
  • A new business strategy leading to new goals or
  • A new boss or
  • A new location or
  • A new policy that affects the way they work

Some of these may be self-selected, for example if an employee wants more challenge or they want to play to their strengths so shape the role to fit their learning requirements.  Others may be caused by the organisation or by other people moving on.

Either way, an employee in one of these situations may need support in figuring out what to let go of and what the new way of being and doing is; and there will be a good deal of uncertainty in the midst of all that, with many questions being unanswerable for a while.  By now, you’ll be recognising this as the transition that is going on internally, matching the change that is external.

Transition Coaching 2 Large

 

 

 

 

 

 

In this situation, it’s ideal if the manager coaches their team member through the stages, asking questions that help the employee to deconstruct the old, recognise the losses, celebrate the endings; find their way through the uncertainty and doubt; and make a good beginning.  Expecting the employee to just get on with it is missing an opportunity for growth and learning.

Of course, if it’s the boss that is changing, the employee will want to talk to someone neutral, so might choose an internal executive coach to help them to figure out how to get good closure with their old boss, and make a good start with their new boss.

In the case of a new location, that may also be better dealt with by an internal or external coach, as there may be many personal issues to sort out as well, such as where to live, children’s schooling, spouse’s needs etc.

Whoever the employee chooses to support them, there will be plenty to think about – and doing that with a sounding board will make the process more thorough, such that things don’t come back to bite the employee for lack of consideration.

 

If you just stumbled across this blog, and want to learn more about creating a coaching culture in your organisation…
Step 1. Receive Clare’s blog posts in your inbox – subscribe below

Step 2. Follow Clare’s Conversations on twitter at @clareenorman

Step 3. Find out how coaching could support your organisation at http://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/

And pass this post on to all your friends and colleagues, so they can join the movement too.

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The Freedom Years

Orange MedalFor those of you living nearby, here’s a great opportunity for you…

Eat well, live well, be well

Brought to you by Foods for Life Nutrition and Clare Norman Coaching Associates Ltd

Living life to the full

As we move on from middle age, we should have more time in our lives to focus on ourselves. Our children are growing up and needing us less, and we may now be welcoming the next generation. We may be supporting elderly parents or looking at our own futures after they have passed away.

This may be a time to take stock of where we are and embrace the Freedom Years. From a health point of view, our needs may have changed. For women, the hormonal chaos of menopause may have left you feeling tired, more conscious of your body and less in control of your future health. You may be considering the aging process and how to minimise the impact it has on you and your life.

How do we manage our health and energy so that we can make the most of this new stage in our life? Foods for Life Nutrition and Clare Norman Coaching have got together to offer you a half day exploration into the Freedom Years.

The half day workshop includes

Nutrition talk

NutritionYvonne will explain how what we eat and drink can support:

  • Hormonal balance
  • Bone health
  • Slowing down the aging process
  • Maximising energy

Yvonne will give practical tips on how to implement the advice and how to balance indulgence with health.

Cookery demonstration and tasters

Tony will show you how to prepare healthy snacks to support day-long energy, with tasters for you to enjoy.

Increasing your energy levels

Clare will enable you to identify areas in your life that are draining you, and areas that energise you, things like:

·         Nutrition

·         Sleep

·         Social Life

·         Time out

·         Activity/fitness

·         Personal Growth

 

·         Family

·         Significant Other

·         Faith or spirituality

·         Finances

·         Fun and recreation

·         Physical environment

You will identify ways that you can reduce the energy sappers and embrace the energy givers. This will get you started on your positive journey into an all-round healthier future.

The logistics

When is it?

Saturday 16th April. Please arrive at 2pm for a 2.15pm start. We will finish at 5.15pm Where is it? Boldre War Memorial Hall, Pilley, Near Lymington.

There is plenty of parking.

What does it cost? 

For 3 hours, including tasters: £45 per person.

About your speakers

Yvonne Bishop-Weston

Yvonne is a Nutritional Therapist who has clinics in Beaulieu, New Forest, and Harley Street, London. Yvonne helps individuals and families reach their optimal health through practical implementation of dietary strategies. Yvonne also delivers talks and workshops and works in the media with regular copy in the national press and via TV and radio.

Clare Norman

Clare is a Professional Certified Coach, and she helps passionate people to live their best story in times of change and times of stability.  As individuals take on new roles, expanded scope, or positive or negative change, Clare coaches them to make good endings and beginnings, despite the emotional turmoil.

Tony Bishop-Weston

Former award winning hotelier in Lochbroom, Scotland, author of a range of plant-based cookbooks, radio and cookery presenter, Tony is passionate about helping people create delicious health-enriching plant-based food; he works with individuals, groups and companies to help them practically implement an optimally healthy diet.

 To book or to ask questions, phone Foods For Life on 01590 612891; or visit http://www.newforesthealth.com/pages/posts/freedom-years-half-day-workshop-new-forest12.php.

If you just stumbled across this blog, and want to learn more about creating a coaching culture in your organisation…
Step 1. Receive Clare’s blog posts in your inbox – subscribe below

Step 2. Follow Clare’s Conversations on twitter at @clareenorman

Step 3. Find out how coaching could support your organisation at http://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/

And pass this post on to all your friends and colleagues, so they can join the movement too.

2 people like this post.

The employee experience: re-joining the workforce

Transitions in organisationsIn this series, we’re looking at how to use coaching to support a phenomenal employee experience during the transitions that employees encounter in their careers.  Coaching isn’t the only intervention of course, but it can help the employee to work with the psychological impact of change – what are they leaving behind, what are they struggling with in the “not knowing”, and how do they make a great new beginning.

Employees who are re-joining the workforce after a break of some kind can benefit from coaching to help them to start strong.  This might be returning mothers (and fathers come to that), but it might also apply to those who have been on a sabbatical, or taken a study break, or been on sick leave.  They will mostly want to start strong.

Coaching for endings for those re-joining the workforce

In the case of the predictable career breaks, it’s wise to start the coaching before they even leave.  There is “closure” to be done, and preparation for the mental shift needed for the break.  It will be a different life for a while, so it makes just as much sense to plan for the break as it does to plan for the return.

Coaching in the neutral zone for those re-joining the workforce

Ideally, coaching in the break can be useful too, to keep the employee connected; and particularly just before they return to work, getting their head and heart back in the game. For working Mums, that’s particularly important, as they now have a different priority in their life and they’ll want to adjust their working patterns to be sure that their new baby’s needs are met.

Coaching for new beginnings for those re-joining the workforce

The new mum has a new identity, and she may be asking questions like, “am I still the person I was?”, “do I see myself as a professional any more?”, “how do I leave my new identity as a mother behind when I go to work?”, “is the best mum the one who goes to work or the one who stays at home?”  This is prime territory for coaching, to enable her to figure out these and many other questions around juggling of priorities, guilt at leaving their child in someone else’s hands, what kind of childcare arrangements to choose etc. Until they have figured out those childcare arrangements, their thoughts about their career are likely to be on the back-burner; so it’s in their and the business’ interests to help them to think this through for their own context.

 

The new Mum has new relationships to tend to, and coaching can really help her to figure out her relationship with the adults in her life (spouse, elders, friends), her relationship with her child, her relationship with the organisation.  Conversations are important in all these relationships, to avoid making assumptions – and to avoid others making assumptions about her needs.  If the Mum can be supported to articulate her needs in these relationships, and articulate those, she is much more likely to have those needs met, rather than people second-guessing what she might want and need.

Of course, the working Mum will need support from others in her network; we’ve purely focused on the coach.  That could be an internal coach or external.  The important thing is that she gets the chance to figure out with a neutral supporter what she is leaving behind, what she is struggling with in the “not knowing” of the new situation, and how she makes a great new beginning that works for her, her family and her organisation.  The same applies for those who take a sabbatical or long-term study leave.

If you just stumbled across this blog, and want to learn more about creating a coaching culture in your organisation…
Step 1. Receive Clare’s blog posts in your inbox – subscribe below

Step 2. Follow Clare’s Conversations on twitter at @clareenorman

Step 3. Find out how coaching could support your organisation at http://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/

And pass this post on to all your friends and colleagues, so they can join the movement too.

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The employee experience: joining the workforce

Transitions in organisationsIn this series, we’re looking at how to use coaching to support a phenomenal employee experience during the transitions that employees encounter in their careers.  Coaching isn’t the only intervention of course, but it can help the employee to work with the psychological impact of change – what are they leaving behind, what are they struggling with in the “not knowing”, and how do they make a great new beginning.

This week, we start with joining the workforce for the first time.

If you think about a hierarchy of needs, the graduate new hire will have some very basic needs to start with, for example the practical stuff for their first day – what to wear, where to go, what to bring, who to ask for. You don’t need a coach for that – it’s information they need at this stage.  Before this though, you can capture their hearts and minds, connecting them with the culture and history of the organisation.  Why wait until day one to do this when you can start to integrate them from the time they accept the job?

Once these needs are met, the graduate new hire may need a healthy dose of reality.  They often come into the workplace with grand plans about how their knowledge can change that workplace for the better.  Their expectations often don’t match what their employer wants them to contribute.

The business needs the following from a new graduate:

  • people with basic professional skills, such as written and verbal communications skills
  • people with technical proficiency
  • team play
  • ability to use company tools, processes and procedures
  • people with a growth mind-set, rather than a fixed mind-set
  • arms and legs to do the administrative side of the work
  • quick learners
  • people prepared to give their all – time and brainpower
  • people who will meet personal due dates, usually short-term by managing own time
  • people who will live by the company values

The new employee probably won’t get the amount of responsibility and authority that they think they should, because there is some real world learning to be had first.  Moving from education to work is a big leap, and requires some skill-building that they may not have received in school (unfortunately).  I don’t mean to diminish the enthusiasm – or knowledge – of the new joiner, but I recognise from my own experience that there is still a lot to be learned about how an organisation works.

This is where they need some good quality mentoring and really good line management, to help the graduate new hire to get an understanding of:

  • how to operate in a company culture, and how that is different from their previous college culture
  • the standards required around here

There is a balance between that reality check and the building of self-esteem. The first manager a person has can make or break a new employee’s future career prospects, because that’s all about belief in themselves and their potential.  This is where they need:

  • stretch assignments that support their learning
  • a caring, developmental first supervisor
  • regular feedback about their progress
  • ownership of small projects where they can make mistakes that help them to learn
  • ability to use their initiative and creativity

Ok, so where does coaching fit in?  Coaching can help the new hire to determine where they can add value and contribute to the organisational needs.  How do their strengths and passions meet the needs of the business?  It can also help them to make the transition from college to work, enabling them to identify those behaviours that they need to leave behind and those that high performance learners embrace.  Ideally, this coaching should start before they join the company, to get them ready for the transition. They might choose to ask their line manager for this kind of coaching, or more likely someone neutral, with no performance management responsibilities for them – an internal or external coach.

We mustn’t forget the importance of a network of peers to swap ideas with, to get personal results, and social opportunities to get to know work colleagues.

All in all, we’ve seen how important relationships are to the new joiner.  The mentor, the first line manager, the peers, the coach all play a part in creating a phenomenal employee experience for their new joiner in their first year of work.

 

 

 

 

 

If you just stumbled across this blog, and want to learn more about creating a coaching culture in your organisation…
Step 1. Receive Clare’s blog posts in your inbox – subscribe below

Step 2. Follow Clare’s Conversations on twitter at @clareenorman

Step 3. Find out how coaching could support your organisation at http://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/

And pass this post on to all your friends and colleagues, so they can join the movement too.

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Coaching to support the employee experience: the organisational lens

We’ve looked at how a coachee might decide whether to ask for coaching from their manager, from an internal coach, or from an external coach, depending on how transparent they feel they can be; we’ve also looked at how a manager-as-coach, internal or external coach might decide whether they can provide the service to the coachee.  Now let’s look through an organisational lens – this could be HR, Learning and Development or a Head of Coaching- to decide when to use each kind of coach.

  1. Context – the manager as coach and internal coach generally have a better understanding of the business context compared to an external coach, such that they don’t need to spend time exploring the meaning of acronyms and organisational structures.  The danger is that the manager as coach and internal coach  may fall into the trap of making the same assumptions about the context as the coachee, rather than questioning them
  2. Costs – the manager as coach provides coaching as part of their role, therefore at no extra cost.  The accredited internal coach provides the same or better coaching value as the external coach at cost rather than commercial price.  Not only that, the organisation has to invest time and money in sourcing and vetting the external coaches, as well as bringing the external coach up to speed on organisational culture and context*.   The cost of continuous professional development and supervision will need to be borne by the organisation for the internal coach, where the external coach will pay for that themselves.
  3. Confidentiality – the internal coaching is equally as bound by their accrediting body’s code of ethics to adhere to confidentiality as the external coach, so this is really a consideration for the coachee to make, rather than the organisation.  The manager as coach should keep confidences, but may feel obliged to consider what they have heard in coaching in the performance management process.
  4. Consistency – the internal coach secures better consistency of approach than working with multiple vendors across the globe.  The organisation will need to decide whether this is important to their culture.
  5. Culture – Managers as coaches and internal coaches have the opportunity to shape the organisation’s culture, by modelling the company values.
  6. Competency – do the managers as coaches and internal coaches have the coaching competencies needed?
  7. Capacity – are there enough managers as coaches and internal coaches with the requisite skills to meet the business needs for coaching? If not, external coaching may be the alternative.

So deciding upon which coaching role is best for a coaching assignment is simple through one lens – does the coachee feel a level of trust in the coach that will allow them to be vulnerable?; and complex when looked at through the organisational lens.

 *Extract from David Rock: Driving Change with Internal Coaching Programs

Hiring

External Coaches

Sourcing

Internal Coaches

Sourcing Coaches High Cost Low cost
Business Understanding High Complexity No cost
Cultural Fit High Complexity No cost
Screening Medium Cost Low cost
Orienting to the organization High cost No cost
Staff Retention of those Coached High Derailment Risk Increased Retention

 

If you just stumbled across this blog, and want to learn more about creating a coaching culture in your organisation…
Step 1. Receive Clare’s blog posts in your inbox – subscribe below

Step 2. Follow Clare’s Conversations on twitter at @clareenorman

Step 3. Find out how coaching could support your organisation at http://www.clarenormancoachingassociates.com/

And pass this post on to all your friends and colleagues, so they can join the movement too.

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Coaching roles to support the employee experience: the coach’s lens

Last week, we looked at the coachee making a choice about whether they could be totally transparent with the different coaching roles played by their manager, an internal coach or an external coach.  But what about those people’s perspectives about whether they feel that they can give the best support and challenge they can?

Coaching roles: Manager as coach’s choices

Some managers may want to coach, and have the skills to coach, but not the capacity.  It’s far better for them to realise that at the outset than damage the relationship with the coachee by continually postponing meetings due to client needs for example.

They may also feel that there are things it is best for them not to know, give their performance management responsibilities.  So they may decide they are not the right coach for the person for this reason.

And perhaps they just don’t feel skilled enough – or even want to coach.

In any of these cases, they should talk to HR about an internal or external coach.

Coaching roles: Internal coach’s choices

An internal coach will know their own capabilities, and may be able to judge whether they are the right coach for the employee.  If not them, perhaps another internal coach.

Maybe the internal coach feels it is best for them as an employee not to coach a person.  There are things we can hear as internal coaches that are difficult for us not to process as an employee of the company – and that can lead us to a difficult relationship with our organisation.  Of course, we cannot predict what will come up in coaching, so we may end up taking this to supervision as and when it occurs; but if we have an inkling before the contract starts, perhaps best to pass the client to an external coach.

In addition, if we believe we cannot challenge the system enough, because we are a part of it, we should pass the client to another coach.  We are sometimes blind to what’s going on in the system, and/or make the same assumptions about the system as our client does – and that will do them and the organisation a disservice if we do not ask how their actions will impact their team, the organisation, society.

Coaching roles: External coach’s choices

There is no back-stop for an external coach, other than another external coach.  But if you notice any conflict of interest or a lack of connection, it is important to pass the client to another external coach.

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